Diversity in the Workplace Assignment | College Homework Help

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June 16, 2020
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June 16, 2020

In this week’s Discussion, you thought about democracy in the workplace. For this Assignment, you will consider how democratic principles in the workplace are related to and might be promoted by diversity. Diversity has different meanings; the particular meaning held by an organization may shape that organization in a variety of ways. Most organizations profess to value diversity in the workforce, and employers view the variety of talents and ideas that a diverse labor pool brings to the job as an economic asset. Diversity may, however, produce more than just economic benefits for an organization. One way to better understand diversity is to think about which aspects of diversity are related to democratic principles. Another way to approach diversity is to look at which democratic principles are promoted in your own organization through diversity. As you consider the concept of diversity, take note of underlying aspects that may advance democracy in the workplace.
To prepare for this Assignment:
Review the article “A Contingency Approach to Representative Bureaucracy: Power, Equal Opportunities and Diversity” in this week’s Learning Resources. Think about the link between diversity and representative bureaucracy in the workplace.
Review the article “The Ideal of Diversity in Organizations” in this week’s Learning Resources.
Consider strategies for advancing diversity in the workplace. Pay particular attention to matters such as individual difference and equality as they relate to diversity in the workplace.
Reflect on basic democratic principles and consider how they are related to diversity.
Select at least two democratic principles that you think are promoted by diversity in the workplace and think about how diversity might or does promote them.
The Assignment (1 page):
Briefly describe the democratic principles that you selected.
Explain how diversity relates to and promotes the democratic principles you selected.
Based on your analysis, share insights and draw conclusions about how diversity relates to and promotes democratic principles in the workplace.

A contingency approach to representative bureaucracy: power, equal opportunities and diversity.
Authors:
Groeneveld, Sandra1
Van de Walle, Steven1
Source:
International Review of Administrative Sciences. Jun2010, Vol. 76 Issue 2, p239-258. 20p.
Document Type:
Article
Subject Terms:
*PUBLIC administration
*POWER (Social sciences)
*BUREAUCRACY
*DEMOCRACY
*EQUALITY
*REPRESENTATIVE government
*NATION building
CONTINGENCY (Philosophy)
CONTINGENCY theory (Management)
Author-Supplied Keywords:
democracy
diversity
equal opportunity
legitimacy
nation-building
power
representative bureaucracy
Abstract:
In this article we develop a contingency approach to representative bureaucracy. We argue that representative bureaucracy is a multidimensional and changing concept, and that in the academic and policy debate on representative bureaucracy three different dimensions are intermingled: power, equal opportunities and diversity. These dimensions not only reflect a particular view on the role of the state and the relation between the state and citizens, they also diverge in the motives for making the bureaucracy representative. Even the conception of what representation means can be totally different. We conclude that modern diversity management approaches alone may not contribute to nation-building because these mainly emphasize organizational performance. Approaches to representative bureaucracy in nation-building must also be built on moral arguments and underline the exemplary role of the state. In addition, the political viability of managerial and moral approaches needs to be taken into account through acknowledging political realities and existing distributions of power in society. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Copyright of International Review of Administrative Sciences is the property of Sage Publications, Ltd. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder’s express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
Author Affiliations:
1Department of Public Administration, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands
ISSN:
0020-8523
DOI:
10.1177/0020852309365670
Accession Number:
52094269
Database:
Political Science Complete

Evaluating Strategies for Negotiating Workers’ Rights in Transnational Corporations: The Effects of Codes of Conduct and Global Agreements on Workplace Democracy.
Images
Chart Chart Chart
Authors:
Egels-Zandén, Niklas1 Niklas.Egels-Zanden@handels.gu.se
Hyllman, Peter2
Source:
Journal of Business Ethics. Dec2007, Vol. 76 Issue 2, p207-223. 17p. 3 Charts.
Document Type:
Report
Subject Terms:
*Employee rights
*Employee rules
*Nongovernmental organizations
*International business enterprises
*International labor activities
*Industrial relations
*Offshore assembly industry
*Social responsibility of business
*Work environment
*Labor unions — Political activity
*Labor organizing
*Labor arbitration
*Quality of work life
*Globalization
Developing countries
Democracy
Author-Supplied Keywords:
code of conduct
corporate responsibility
global agreement
international framework agreement
labour practice
non-governmental organisation
transnational corporation
union
workplace democracy
NAICS/Industry Codes:
926150 Regulation, Licensing, and Inspection of Miscellaneous Commercial Sectors
813930 Labor Unions and Similar Labor Organizations
Abstract:
Following the offshoring of production to developing countries by transnational corporations (TNCs), unions and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) have criticised working conditions at TNCs’ offshore factories. This has led to the emergence of two different approaches to operationalising TNC responsibilities for workers’ rights in developing countries: codes of conduct and global agreements. Despite the importance of this development, few studies have systematically compared the effects of these two different ways of dealing with workers’ rights. This article addresses this gap by analysing how codes of conduct and global agreements both independently and interactively affect workers’ rights. We do this based on a qualitative study of the Sri Lankan operations of a Swedish TNC in Sri␣Lanka, and on interviews with union and NGO representatives actively involved in codes of conduct and global agreements. Our results indicate that global agreements independently address all the aspects included in codes of conduct, while also addressing additional, more process-oriented aspects of workers’ rights. Hence, on their own, global agreements seem to comprise the superior approach to promoting workers’ rights. Furthermore, our results indicate that promoting codes of conduct has negative interactive effects on global agreements. Based on these results, we argue that the current focus on codes of conduct is counterproductive for the promotion of workers’ rights. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Business Ethics is the property of Springer Nature and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder’s express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
Author Affiliations:
1Centre for Business in Society, School of Business , Economics and Law at Göteborg University , Box 600 Gothenborg SE-405 30 Sweden
2Centre for People and Organization , Stockholm School of Economics , Box 6501 Stockholm SE-113 83 Sweden
ISSN:
0167-4544
DOI:
10.1007/s10551-006-9269-0
Accession Number:
27162834
Database:
Business Source Complete
Images:

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