Beyond Rewards and Punishment to Democratic Classrooms Assignment | Online Homework Help

Effects of Sunscreen on Skin Cancer Assignment | Online Homework Help
June 14, 2020
EFAS Table Assignment | Get Paper Help
June 14, 2020

First, review the book “Teaching to Change the World”, 5th Edition by Oakes, Lipton, Anderson, & Stillman, Chapter 8: Classrooms as Communities: Developing Caring and Democratic Relationships (pp. 274-310) titled “An Ethic of Care” from Study Concept Table 8.1 “Comparison of Punitive and Restorative Justice Responses in Schools” if you have not yet done so.

Then, based on the two diagrams and the paragraph(s) you set aside earlier, readings, create a poster that represents “Declaration: Beyond Rewards and Punishments to Democratic Classrooms.”

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
Beyond Rewards and Punishment to Democratic Classrooms Assignment | Online Homework Help
Just from $13/Page
Order Essay

Feel free to be creative when creating your poster! You may wish to make your poster visually appealing with an educational tool, such as Canva, Piktochart, or Prezi. These tools offer free versions, but may require registration. You are encouraged to get familiar with these tools, as you may someday decide to use them for teaching. Alternatively, you can create your poster in Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Adobe Photoshop, or with any other software you’re comfortable using.

I thought the following might be helpful.

Schooling in the United States has a long history and its story of conflict. Understanding the conflict is evident in three different viewpoints about the purpose of schooling. These viewpoints are political based on differing beliefs about the purpose of education. Understanding conflicting paradigms necessitates thinking systemically. This is difficult given our default linear thinking of cause and effect. Therefore, my investigation involves identifying not only the beliefs comprising each of the system or paradigm; but, includes how the beliefs are interconnected and interdependent. Each belief is connected to and acts on every other belief in the system. This necessitates understanding how each belief functions within the context of the whole and no belief exists independently. For example, if the purpose of schooling is to “rank and sort” students socializing them to passively and compliantly work long hours in labor-and-factory- oriented jobs, then what would be …

The role of the student in the classroom and school regarding curriculum, assessment, theory/ies of learning, configuration of the classroom, school facility, accountability, role of the teacher, feedback and response, epistemology, and classroom management?

The role of the teacher in the classroom and school regarding curriculum, assessment, theory/ies of learning, configuration of the classroom, school facility, accountability, role of the teacher, feedback and response, epistemology, and classroom management?

The source(s) and configuration of curriculum in the classroom and school regarding the role of the student, role of the teacher, assessment, theory/ies of learning, configuration of the classroom, school facility, accountability, role of the teacher, feedback and response, epistemology, and classroom management?

The source(s) and configuration(s) of assessment, the source(s) and configuration of curriculum, the role of the student, role of the teacher, feedback and response, assessment, theory/ies of learning, configuration of the classroom, school facility, accountability, role of the teacher, epistemology, and classroom management?

The theory(ies) of learning, the source(s) and configuration(s) of assessment, the source(s) and configuration of curriculum, the role of the student, role of the teacher, assessment, theory/ies of learning, configuration of the classroom, school facility, accountability, role of the teacher, epistemology, and classroom management?

The school system is comprised of students, teachers, the school board, state, and federal government leaders. The preceding sentence identifies the “players” in schooling. However, we do not know the ways in which they interact. Studying the players necessitates identifying the paradigm or system of beliefs governing ways of relating. For example, when people talk or write about the school system or education, they most likely are addressing the dominant paradigm. This extends to claims of success and failure about education reform. Anyone wishing to be a socially just teacher and/or social justice advocate needs to identify the context in which the school systems’ stakeholders. This investigation, therefore, focuses on three different contexts for schooling with each being a paradigm labeled in different ways:

Traditional Transmissive Essentialist Behaviorist Industrialist-Capitalists Curriculum-Centered Exclusionary Patriarchal Didactic Banking Model Paradigm

Transactive Pragmatic Progressivist Constructivist Learner-Centered Culturally-Responsive Inquiry Critical Pedagogy Paradigm

Transformative Social Reconstructionist Social Constructivism Learner-Centered Societal Program-Posing Community-Centered Multicultural Critical Paradigm

People can have personal paradigms and shared paradigms; some easier to change that others. A schooling paradigm is not changed easily and there exists strong resistance to paradigmatic change. A paradigm shift is synonymous with a revolution in thought. An example of such a shift in thinking is John Dewey’s conception of an education system. He called the established system, the “old” system of education at the end of the nineteenth and early part of the 20thcentury. He was referring to the schooling system still entrenched today: the Traditional Transmissive Essentialist Behaviorist Industrialist-Capitalists Curriculum-Centered Exclusionary Patriarchal Didactic Banking Model ParadigmBe

                                                                                Place Order